Q&A: Is Algaecide safe for fish, snails, and crustaceans?

 

Algecide in Pond

Yes, when used as directed, algaecide is safe for fish and plants. However, there is an exception. Algaecide is toxic to aquatic invertebrates which include some species of fish and crustaceans. Aquatic invertebrates do not have a backbone or spinal column. These include earthworms, sea stars, sea urchins, jellyfish, squid, snails, lobsters, crabs, shrimp, etc… There are a few classes of fish that are also invertebrates, such as Jawless Fish (Class Agnatha) and Cartilaginous Fish (Class Chondrichthyes) which don’t have a true backbone, instead, they have a skeleton made of cartilage instead of bone.

 

 


Learn more about aquatic invertebrates and cartilaginous fish from these online sources:

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fishing/jawless-fish.htm

https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fishing/jawed-fish.htm

Posted in Q&A

Choosing and Installing Your Beckett Condensate Pump

Here are a few key steps and tips for the proper selection and installation of your Beckett Condensate Pump. For additional tips or support, contact our customer service team at CustomerService@BeckettUS.com or 866-466-4319.


Step 1: Size the Pump to Match the Application
Always review the aount of condensate water producted from the HVAC system. Beckett’s CB15 & CB20 series pumps with a ½ gallon tank can handle the typical amount of condensate produced from a residential HVAC system.

Step 2: Will the Pump Lift Water High Enough in the Application?
Condensate pumps move less water the higher the peak of the discharge tubing is placed. Define how high this discharge tubing peak will be above the condensate pump and compare that to the performance table to be sure you choose the correct pump. See two examples below:

1. Residential HVAC system located on the floor of a single-story home, peak lift point will be to clear an 8-foot wall. Peak lift point=8 feet, best pump selection would be CB15

2. Residential HVAC system located in the basement of a single-story home, peak lift point will be to clear an 8-foot wall on the upper level. Peak lift point=16 feet

Peak Flow HVAC Beckett Pumps

 

Install Condensate Pump Beckett

Note: An additional application issue might be the length of the horizontal run of the discharge tubing. A general rule of thumb is a loss of 6” lift for every 10’ of horizontal run for tubing sizes below ½”. This reduction in lift is not a concern after the peak lift point if you can slant the discharge tubing to take advantage of gravity clearing the tubing.


Step 3: Locate the Condensate Pump
Beckett CB15 & 20 series pumps have a 6-foot power cord with a grounded plug for power so be sure the pump’s location allows access to a properly grounded receptacle. The pump should be located below the drain pan of the HVAC system so gravity allows a natural flow to the condensate pump inlet. The pump can sit on the floor or be mounted onto the wall using the mounting tabs. Use a level to ensure that the pump is installed level as the float switches inside depend on water levels to turn on and off.

Step 4: Install Inlet and Discharge Tubing
Beckett’s CB15 & 20 series pumps have 3 inlet holes on the lid that can be pressed out to best match the installation. Be sure the drain tubing extends past the lid of the pump at least 1” to avoid splashing. Discharge tubing is connected to the 3/8” barb outlet, a hose clamp or zip tie can be used to ensure drip-free operation. It is best to slant the discharge tubing down after the peak so gravity helps clear the tubing.

Step 5: Safety Switch (depending on pump model)
Some Beckett condensate pumps include an additional safety switch which is designed to be wired in series into the low voltage thermostat circuit to shut down the source of the condensate water in the event of a pump failure. Using this feature may prevent overflow of the pump. This safety switch can also be wired to an external alarm as a signal that pump flooding is possible.

Safety
Always reference included installation manuals for safety warnings


Contact Beckett Customer Service at CustomerService@BeckettUS.com or 866-466-4319 for any questions or support during your pump selection or installation.

Posted in Q&A

Q&A: Solar Light Power Button On/Off

One question we often receive is: How do I know if my solar lights are on or off?

Several of our Beckett products feature an on/off button, which causes some customers to wonder how they can if the product is turned on or off. This Q&A talks specifically about our Beckett Solar Powered Submersible LED Light Set, seen here.

Solar LED Light Set
Beckett Solar Powered Submersible LED Light Set

Answer: When you first open the package, press the power button ON. In the OFF position, the push button will feel slightly taller/raised than when the button is in the ON position. Turn the solar panel down, facing the ground, or cover it with your hand. If the lights turn on then it is working properly.


There is no need to turn OFF the lights as they automatically turn on at night and back on during the day.

How Much Sunlight Should they Receive?
For optimal performance, the solar panel should receive 4-6 hours of direct sunlight on a daily basis.

Troubleshooting Tip:
If your lights stop working after you started using them, it’s likely that the solar panel battery is not receiving enough sunlight to recharge the battery. This is especially common during overcast, cloudy days when there is no direct sunlight. Reposition the solar panel where it may receive direct sunlight to properly recharge.


For more tips or answers to your questions on LED lights, or any Beckett product, contact our customer service team at CustomerService@BeckettUS.com or 866-466-4319.

Posted in Q&A

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